Walking

Pembrokeshire really is a walker’s paradise. Here are a few of our favourite hikes…

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Brandy Brook

If you’re seeking a relaxing nature walk, head for Rhyndaston Mountain and Eweston Wood in Brandy Brook, which can be seen from the eco barns. When you’re there, keep an eye out for the many woodland birds that live in the small valley, including buzzards and owls.

Roch Ridge Walk

A geological ridge runs between nearby Roch and the dramatic river gorge at Treffgarne. Make your way onto nearby Plumstone Mountain from the eco barns, and then hike across to Great Treffgarne Mountain and Great Treffgarne Rocks overlooking the dramatic river gorge of the Western Cleddau below.

Pembrokeshire Coast Path

Now part of the Wales Coastal Path, the Pembrokeshire Coast Path offers 186 miles of stunning coastal walking. At its closest it is only around 3.5 miles from the eco barns, near Penycwm.

As well as the breathtaking views, what makes the Pembrokeshire Coast Path so captivating is the landscape diversity you hike through, ranging from steep limestone cliffs and red sandstone bays to volcanic headlands and flooded glacial valleys.

Then there’s the wonderful wildlife living along this dramatic coastline… you may even be lucky enough to spot whales, porpoises and dolphins.

A wonderful stretch runs from nearby Newgale Sands to Druidston, where you can stop off for refreshment at the Druidston Hotel, and catch a bus back to Newgale if you time your hike well.

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Preseli Mountains

Wherever you decide to walk in the Preselis, you’re sure to be captivated by their beauty and solitude. Hike up to the top of Carn Ingli, a ‘holy mountain’ linked to the Irish St. Brynach, for stunning views across to Snowdonia, the Llyn Peninsula and even Ireland.

Or follow the ancient and atmospheric Golden Road ridge walk. The bordering Gwaun Valley also offers good walking, and is rich in ancient tradition and folklore. Don’t miss the Dyffryn Arms aka Bessie’s, in Pontfaen – there really is no pub quite like it!

Anghof Valley and Sealyham

These little explored walking gems are some of our favourites. The western Cleddau cuts through this dramatic wooded river gorge. Walk on down through the gorge or climb atop Treffgarne Rocks for the views.

The Anghof is a tributary which meets the western Cleddau at Wolfscastle. The wooded circular Anghof walk from Wolfscastle to the Old Quarry Bridge and Sealyham is truly wonderful – and don’t miss the Irish Ogham stone at St. Dogwell’s church! Take care with children as there are some old quarry workings in the woods.

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